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Stocks & Shares: Looking at Essel Propack

Essel Propack claims to be “the largest global specialty packaging company in the world”. Tell me, which product does not need packaging! Every product does.

ess

Essel Propack provides packaging solutions not only to Beauty & Cosmetics companies, and  pharmaceutical companies, but also to the food packaging industries.

Now what got me interested in EP? Two news points: 

  • A huge drop in crude oil price has benefited many companies from the industry, as plastic is derived from by petroleum refining products. Lower the cost of oil, lower is the cost of plastic raw materials used across product manufacturing units to produce finished goods. 

  • Essel Propack, the world’s largest laminated tubes manufacturer, is understood to design and manufacture tube packaging requirement of Patanjali, which is growing in triple digits and is expected to touch Rs 10,000 crore turnover in the current fiscal.

Additionally, if you look at the fundamentals, it does seem like pretty good, if not great, investment opportunity given the abundance of over-valued stocks around us. A P/E ratio below 21 in this investment climate seems pretty decent.

What do you think? 

P.S.: At the time of writing this blog (end of day 4th July, 2017), the share of Essel Propack had been trading at Rs. 242.00 in the NSE.

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144: Time to Quadruple

In the article “The Number 72“, we learnt how to guesstimate the time required for an amount of money to double if invested at a defined rate of annual interest. Click here to access the article.

Then, we learnt about the number 114 in the article “Triple Your Money“, where we learnt about the time required for an amount of money to triple at a specified rate of interest. Click here to access the article.

144

Picture Credit: commons.wikimedia.org

Now, in the last article in this series, we shall become aware of another power number – the number 144. And as the article suggests, it shall help guesstimate the time required for an amount to quadruple i.e., become 4 times its original value for a given rate of interest. And if you have followed the previous articles, you already know the formula:

(Number of years to quadruple) x (Rate of Interest p.a.) = 144

So, if you have a 1000 INR note, you know that it would become INR 4000 at 12% rate of interest in?

Yes, 12 years. Simple, isn’t it?

Hope you find this trick useful.

Note: This is an estimate to be used to make your life easier and does not give an answer accurate to the number of days. Also, the higher the expected rate of interest, the less accurate does the formula become but still you can use it safely!

If you like this trick, like and share this article. Comment if you know more such tricks.

The Number 72

72

Often we see investment advertisements which promise to double our money in (say) 9 years. Sounds good, doesn’t it?

Or don’t you wonder sometime, in how many years your money would double, if a Mutual Fund has been historically providing a return of 12%? Or, if you have INR 50 lacs, given the inflation rate of 8% (say), in how years would its value reduce by half in present terms?

(Answer to the three questions above are given at the end of the article.) 

The answer can be found out easily with a simple trick:

(Number of years to double) x (Rate of Interest p.a.) = 72

So, if someone promises you a rate of return of 9%, know that your money would be doubled in 8 years. If inflation is somewhere near 6%, know that your current kitty would be diminished by half in 12 years if not invested elsewhere.

Do the math!

If you like this trick, like and share this article. Comment if you know more such tricks.

Happy learning!

Answers: 8%; 6 years; 9 years. 

Picture Courtesy: https://in.pinterest.com/pin/53902526760366711/

Note: This is an estimate to be used to make your life easier and does not give an answer accurate to the number of days. Also, the higher the expected rate of interest, the less accurate does the formula become but still you can use it safely!